The Cure Closes ACL Festival in Rain

Heavy rain the final half hour of the cure’s 2 hour show was the sign that cinched the cancellation of the third day do the ACL 2013 festival. It didn’t matter that I traveled with a terribly expensive flight from Georgia to Texas for the three day music festival, rain was more powerful than man. Doggedly determined to involve myself in living and at least viewing performing arts, I packed a knee brace and gear suited for festival going. Being

officially disabled now for two years, but in pain for fifteen, I had acclimated to availing myself of services offered for assistance, whether a wheelchair or an aisle seat, making it possible to travel. This wasn’t easy. It wasn’t nearly as easy as when I was healthy, but it was a compromise that I made. That was the price I paid for working after the car accident. Never again could I wear high heels. Never again could I walk, skip, dance, run without dire consequences.

I was shown how to gracefully accept help by a lovely group of Canadians who fought over who would push my wheelchair through the Chicago Art Institute. They had learned the awful truth of growing old, of injuries, I had not. Behind my back they commented that it was a shame I was in a walking boot (modern day cast)instead of bejeweled evening shoes at the ballet. They were so kind. They taught me a love and compassion for myself that I had never encountered. I nearly backed out of going to Chicago, and was glad that I didn’t.

My mission is to live my life without regrets. I have never regretted taking a trip.

The ACL Music Festival was a new type of trip. An affectionado of alternative rock all my life, the festival was a candy store of music that appealed to my tastes. But what about the walking? Well, that was a concern. Even though it was a “5 minute walk” away from the park, there were two major hills to scale. I had a tremendous, painful blister on my heel after the first day. Thank goodness I didn’t have to carry a chair. While it was super nice of my hosts to offer me a folding chair to use, it must have weighed 30 poulds. Well, actually it wasn’t that heavy, but it sure felt heavy to my nerve damaged arms.

The hardest walk was the detour I took in the dark and rain. After The Cure played, we all walked out in the rain and dark. I got lost and rambled around many blocks for 45 minutes until I arrived at the right house, rain soaked from the waist down. There were streams of rain surging through the streets and sometimes I was wading through 4 inches of water. I was tired, wet, annoyed and hungry. I had stopped in a gas station to buy two chocolate bars and some Perrier. The pile of people (mostly in their 20s) under the scant awning of the gas station were singing, laughing and having a grand time. Their happiness was infectious. It was a pleasure to remember the young abandon of singing, semi drunk on life. They were cute. Oh Dear! How old I sound!

By the time I got up to my room, I had a major blister on my thigh from my knee brace. Ignoring blisters is something that you do naturally if you were a ballet dancer. I was surprised at how tender my skin was and how quickly the blister grew. This was definitely not the highlight of the trip. However, now I have another happy memory of how I struck out and spent two days hot, blistered and sunburnt and still believe that I had a good time. It was all fun. It was an adventure. There weren’t a lot of people with grey-white hair like mine there, to be sure. I may be really old on the outside, but I still remember how to appreciate singing in the rain like a 20 year old.

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